headlines

UFCW Condemns White House Decision to End DACA

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Marc Perrone, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) International Union, issued the following statement regarding the Trump Administration’s termination of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA):

“President Trump’s decision to end DACA is cold-hearted, cruel, and a betrayal of what America stands for. 

“Hundreds of thousands of young, hard-working men and women who love America will now be needlessly punished for childhood circumstances. These young people have grown up in this country, passed background checks, pay taxes, go to school, and have worked hard to build a better America. They have earned and deserve fair treatment, but instead their lives are being thrown into chaos with this announcement. 

“President Trump’s decision will not make America great again; rather, it will tear families apart, damage communities, and further fuel a terrible divide that is already hurting the nation we all love. 

“On behalf of the 1.3 million members of our union family, we urge all Members of Congress to immediately do what is right and protect these Dreamers.” 

Background:
  • Terminating DACA needlessly removes 800,000 hard-working men and women from our workforce.
  • It will cost $433.4 billion in GDP loss over a decade.
  • It will cost employers $3.4 billion in unnecessary turnover costs.
  • Contributions to Medicare and Social Security will be cut by $24.6 billion over a decade.
  • Some 6% of DACA recipients have launched businesses that employ American citizens.
  • Almost 55% of DACA recipients have purchased a vehicle, and more than one in ten have purchased their first home.
  • Source: ILRC, The Economic Cost of Ending DACA

2017 United Latinos Educational Conference

Be Bold, Speak Out, Fight Back! 

Agenda Overview

 

Thursday

Registration 12 noon

Welcome Reception 6 pm

 

Friday

Conference Kick off 8:30 am

Workshops 2pm – 4pm

 

Saturday

Conference Starts 9 am

Workshops 2pm – 4pm

Reception 6pm

Awards Gala 7 pm

This Year’s Honorees include;

Joe Barragan Award: UFCW Canada

John Rene Rodriguez Award: RWDSU

Building Community/Building Union Community Allies Award –

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights 

Champions for Justice Award:

UFCW Local 1776 and UFCW Local 1149

Sunday

Breakfast 8am

Screening of “The Long Ride”  9 am

Immigration Update 10:45 – 12pm

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS!

In the United States, every person—whether documented or undocumented—has the constitutional right to remain silent and to refuse to answer questions of the police, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), or the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), whether on the street, in a car, or at home.

Under the law, the ICE must have proof you are not from the United States to deport you. They can use the following information against you:

• If you run and the ICE catches you.

• If you tell the ICE where you were born or that you don’t have papers.

• If you carry false documents.

• If you carry papers from your country. If you are questioned by the ICE, you are NOT required to reveal any information, such as your name, address, or home country. If you are questioned or detained, however, it usually is a good idea to give your name so that friends, family, or your attorney can locate you.

Below are links to resources that will help you understand your rights in the United States.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS CARD

FAMILY PREPAREDNESS PLAN

KNOW HOW TO PROTECT YOUR FAMILY


¡CONOZCA SUS DERECHOS!

En los Estados Unidos, toda persona—documentada o no documentada—tiene el derecho a callar y a rehusarse a contestar preguntas de la policía, la Agencia Federal de Investigaciones (FBI), o de la migra, ya sea en la calle, en un carro, o en su casa.

Bajo la ley, la migra necesita tener pruebas de que usted no es de este país para deportarlo. Ellos pueden usar la siguiente información en su contra:

• Si usted corre y la migra lo agarra.

• Si usted le dice a la migra donde nació y que no tiene papeles.

• Si usted usa documentos falsos.

• Si usted usa documentos de su país. Si es interrogado por la migra, usted NO está obligado a revelar ninguna información, como su nombre, dirección o el país de origen. Sin embargo, si es interrogado es buena idea dar su nombre para que su familia, amigos o abogado puedan localizarlo.

A continuación encontrará enlaces a recursos que le ayudarán a entender sus derechos en los Estados Unidos.

CONOZCA SU TARJETA DE DERECHOS

PLAN DE PREPARACIÓN PARA LA FAMILIA


Your Vote. Your Voice.

This election will determine who will be our President for the next four years – but there’s so much more on the line. From local, statewide and national elections, the Latino vote can determine our country’s future.   Latinos taking action at the polls can influence outcomes. The candidates we elect, will affect our communities – we need to make sure our voices are heard!

The Latino population has grown into the largest minority group in the United States, a transformation that makes this voting block increasingly influential in this November’s presidential election.

Register to vote November 8th.  Don’t miss out!  Make your voice heard.  Remember your vote is your voice.  Click here to register to vote online.

Find out when your voter registration deadline is: Get Your Election Info

UFCW Leaders Receive National Recognition from LCLAA

The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement announced that UFCW President Marc Perrone and Secretary-Treasurer Esther Lopez were named honorees at their 21st Annual Convention in Orlando, Florida.

Esther Lopez honored with the Women’s National Leadership Award and Marc Perrone with the Solidaridad Award.

For decades, Esther Lopez has worked tirelessly to bring social and economic justice to every corner of the United States and beyond. Esther is best known for her leadership on comprehensive immigration reform, recognizing the issue as central to civil, human and labor rights.
Marc has committed his lifelong career in the service of hard-working families. Now at the helm of one of the country’s most diverse and dynamic labor unions, Marc’s bold leadership and vision is defining a new direction for the UFCW that remains committed to the values the UFCW will always stand for.

The United Latinos of UFCW is proud of all the work that Marc and Esther continue to do, not only for Latino workers but all workers.

The UFCW is connecting with all workers

During Wednesday night’s Democratic debate on Univision, UFCW launched 2 Spanish-language ads featuring UFCW members.  The ads focus on immigration, encouragement for naturalized members to become U.S. Citizens, registering to vote and turning out to vote in elections.

The two ads are part of a larger campaign effort, both through social media and on the ground, to reach immigrant workers. Approximately, 8.8 million legal permanent residents, currently in the U.S., can become U.S. citizens, and UFCW aims to connect with them. The UFCW has had an initiative program titled the “Union Citizenship Action Network” (UCAN) that has provided immigrant members with resources for the naturalization and citizenship process.

“Our union is positioned to transform the lives of our members and all workers that deserve to be our members. Because if you live and work in America, if you’re contributing to the prosperity of this nation, you should have the opportunity to become an American that’s a fundamental principle of our participatory democracy,” said UFCW International Secretary-Treasurer Esther López.

Fulfilling America’s Promise for Immigrants

 

UFCW President Marc Perrone and Executive VP and UL Board Member Esther Lopez authored an Op-ed piece on immigration published in The Hill on July 4th.  Entitled “Fulfilling America’s Promise for Immigrants,” the piece talks about the urgent need to reform our broken immigration system. You can read the full text of the op-ed below:

 

For most, the Fourth of July is about celebrating America. It’s a day to spend with family, enjoy great food and fireworks. For immigrant workers, their families and communities, the Fourth of July is about celebrating the promise of America. It is about a getting a fair shot and realizing the American dream, the same dream that has motivated so many to take unimaginable risks to become part of our great country.
From Albert Einstein to Mother Jones, immigrant workers from all over the world have contributed to the social fabric of America and made this country what it is. Yet the newest generation of immigrants continues to wait for our elected officials to wake up, do what’s right and provide the protection they desperately need to contribute their share.
President Obama’s executive action on immigration was one small step forward, but it was only a minimal response to a real crisis that has only grown under his watch. Republican Congressional leaders have refused to hear the calls for change and remain fixated on broken policies and political rhetoric that only serve to perpetuate this crisis.

Looking ahead, the 2016 presidential elections offer all of us a real opportunity to change the narrative and discourse of inaction surrounding immigration. It offers us a chance to question our leaders, especially those running for president, on where they stand. Do they truly believe granting hard-working aspiring Americans temporary relief is enough? What are their specific policies that will give real hope to millions of immigrant workers and their families? Will they publicly commit to solving this issue within their first hundred days or not? For the sake of millions of families, we must be willing to demand real and substantive answers to these questions now.

 

As potential presidential candidates continue to stake out their position on immigration and immigration reform, the stakes have never been higher for hard-working families to demand more from each of them — regardless of party. Millions of aspiring Americans remain in limbo and in danger of deportation because of our outdated immigration policies and the politicians that turn a blind eye to exploitative labor practices that drive down wages, benefits and working conditions for all workers.

 

The United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) has seen firsthand the devastation caused by our broken immigration system. From Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids in meatpacking plants to the endless threat of deportation, immigrant communities across the United States have suffered from an ideology of indifference that has pervaded our political system. This must change, and it must change now.

 

Working together to achieve real reform, we can empower all workers to chase the American dream; but we can’t do so if elected leaders continue to ignore this issue. Creating the better America we believe in demands that our leaders embrace the solemn responsibility they have to fulfill America’s amazing immigrant promise. Comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship is one bold step in making the American dream a reality and fulfilling America’s immigrant promise.

 

This July 4, let us declare our independence from political indifference and demand our elected leaders, and especially those running for president, live up to a higher standard of leadership. Let us solve this problem now, not later. Because when we do, millions of families and this nation will better because of it.  

 

Perrone is the president of the 1.3 million member United Food and Commercial Workers International Union. López is executive vice president of the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union.

Study shows: Latina women benefit most from unionization

A recent study conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research shows the union advantages for women.  The study also shows that Latina women benefit most from unionization.

This is another reason the United Latinos of the UFCW play such an important role in teaching all workers that there is a better way of life that includes wages, health benefits, pensions, job security and dignity.

 Diversity 2

UFCW Local 655 Hosts Diversity Training for Local Leaders

UFCW Local 655 members and staff in Saint Louis, Mo., attended the first Equity and Inclusion Diversity Leadership Training put together by the UFCW Civil Rights and Community Action Department. Over the course of two and a half days, about a dozen UFCW Local 655 leaders from a variety of backgrounds participated in the first session of the three-part diversity training series. The training was developed to help increase staff and members’ knowledge and awareness of diversity issues and elevate the importance of inclusiveness in local unions. The program focuses on local union leaders developing cultural competence with a new set of attitudes, skills, and behaviors in order to have themselves and their organizations work effectively in cross-cultural situations and workplace diversity. Ultimately, the trainings are designed to empower participants to take action and help steer their local union to develop and promote organizational equity and focus on fairness in order to create change in a local union’s culture.

“Stepping outside of my comfort zone may be uncomfortable, but it can be a stepping stone for my future responsibilities as a leader in my local union. Thanks to the diversity training, I am ready to go back to work and start taking action to build relationships with other members to empower us to stand united for justice and equality in our union and in our communities,” said UFCW Local 655 member Amy Nichols.

UFCW Local 655 hosted their diversity training for local union leaders in response to the recent events in Ferguson, Mo., and the impact that the Ferguson events have had on the labor movement in the state. The first session in the diversity training is titled “Why Diversity Matters.” During this session, participants were involved in an open dialogue about the origin of racism, and the history of racial inequality and its roots in economic injustice. They examined different identities and how they relate to people in the workplace and society. Participants discussed the ways people experience or observe different forms of discrimination at work and in the community. They also learned about what being an ally and having solidarity means in a labor context.

“We need to have the difficult conversations with our coworkers, members, and the community about why this fight for equality is so important. We need to take the conversations from the trainings out to our workplaces and communities if we want to start taking real action to create change and an environment of inclusiveness,” said UFCW Local 655 staffer Theresa Hester.

During the first session, participants were later joined by young activists from Missouri, who are fighting for social and economic justice in Ferguson and throughout the state. Participants will follow up the training with recruiting members and coworkers for the April 15 Workers’ Day of Action activities.

“In today’s America where we are more diverse as a country than ever, it is incumbent on current labor to develop future leaders that act and look like our society. If our current labor leaders do not provide the needed training to a young diverse workforce our labor leaders tomorrow will not reflect the make-up of our society. On a broader spectrum, I would hope all leaders not just labor leaders would be training for a more diverse leadership team in the future. I believe the best possibility to end the wealth disparity in America is to have diverse leaders in the future and the only way to achieve this is to provide leadership training today to a diverse group of workers,” said UFCW Local 655 President Dave Cook.

“The training for new UFCW leaders is critical at this juncture of the union movement. Union leaders will need to have new skills to recruit and engage members in a changing workforce demographic. I’m encouraged to see union leaders such as UFCW Local 655 President Dave Cook, taking the initiative to embrace this challenge of diversity and racial equity and getting leaders in the local involved. Unions must take on the dual fight against the various “isms” both inside and outside the union. Unions are a critical part of the social justice movement that’s building power for all workers,” said Jamala Rogers, one of the diversity program trainers, a retired teacher and member of AFT.

UFCW Local 655 will complete the other two parts of the diversity program in the coming months. The second session will be “Race and Politics,” which will take place in July, and the third session “New Generation Diversity: I Am Today’s Leader,” will take place in November.

To see some great discussion and other highlights from this training session, click here.

To learn more about the diversity trainings and hosting a training at your local, contact the UFCW Civil Rights and Community Action Department at civilrights@ufcw.org.

Diversity 3 Diversity 2

UFCW Immigration Workshop Helps Local 75 Member Achieve Dream of Citizenship

ernestinaErnestina Aldana has been a UFCW Local 75 member since she started working at the John Morrell meat processing plant in Cincinnati in 1996. She moved to the U.S. from Guatemala with her husband and son in 1990. The family left Guatemala in search of opportunity and a better life. Ernestina and her husband, who also works at John Morrell, now have three children, the oldest of whom is in college.

“I wanted to become a United States citizen so that I could live and work with freedom and without fear. I wanted my children to have opportunities,” says Ernestina. “But it was the union that motivated me to finally do it.”

Ernestina attended Local 75’s first citizenship clinic on November 8, 2014. With the help of union and community volunteers, she completed her application that same day. On Friday, March 13, Ernestina took her oath of citizenship, along with two other UFCW members, at the federal courthouse in Cincinnati, Ohio.

A 19-year member of UFCW Local 75, Ernestina says union membership has meant more to her than higher wages and job security: “Being a union member gave me hope for the future. Having hope got me here today.”