K Martinez

Labor Against Cancer

2018 Partnership Resource Guide UFCW

Greeting Members!

We’re the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW) – a union family that helps feed, serve, and provide for America’s hard-working families. For more than 35 years we have been part of another family – a proud family of dedicated volunteers of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS). Locals across the US and Canada have raised more than $85 Million dollars for blood cancer cures since our partnership began.

Our 1.3 million members are your friends and neighbors, and we’re there to help your family achieve a better life and so is LLS. As the world’s largest voluntary health organization, LLS is dedicated to funding blood cancer research, education, and patient services. Since 1949, LLS has invested more than $1.2 billion in research projects, supporting some of the world’s best and brightest blood cancer researchers. Currently, LLS has 227 active research projects in 8 countries.

LLS funded research has advanced treatments such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and smart drugs which have become the standard for many other cancers. Thanks to your steadfast commitment and participation, the UFCW has played a very important role in the LLS advancements.

When a friend, neighbor or family member hears the words, “you have cancer” this can be among their darkest of days. Patients and their families need hope, cures and support. LLS is here! Enclosed in this booklet is a complete resource guide of ways LLS provides dedicated support to those in need as they work to improve the lives of patients and families they serve.

Together, we make cures happen, not someday – today! Thank you for choosing to make a difference.

Sincerely,

Marc Perrone                                   Louis J. DeGennaro, Ph.D

International President, UFCW President and CEO, LLS

 

Click Here for the 2018 Partnership Resource Guide UFCW

What Unions Need to Know of TPS

As you may have heard, the Department of Homeland Security has announced the termination of Temporary Protected Status for numerous countries. Hundreds of thousands of people receive their work authorization through TPS, so these terminations will have a serious impact on workers, including many union members.

This packet includes essential information to help unions and their members prepare. Here’s what you need to know:

Terminations are not immediate.

Although the Trump administration has announced terminations for many TPS countries, the status will not end for many months. Workers with TPS can and should apply to renew their status, and employers should not take any adverse action against these workers.

Deadlines are approaching quickly.

There are important deadlines approaching that members need to be aware of so that they can successfully reapply for TPS status and work permits. Although they may have filed TPS renewals many times in the past, this likely will be the final opportunity to apply, so they should prepare thoroughly and submit their applications as soon as possible. A schedule of upcoming deadlines is included in the timeline and will be updated as TPS announcements are made for other countries.

Unions have a key role to play.

Working people with TPS need to know that the union has their back during this extremely difficult time. Unions should be informed about the issue, provide information and support to their members, and engage in the fight for legislative solutions.

Workers need to take steps now.

Before the deadlines, TPS holders will need to file the relevant application forms with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and pay the $495 fee to renew their work authorization. This packet includes helpful materials to share with workers explaining how and when to renew TPS status.

TPS holders should face no immediate impact at work.

Employment authorization documents (EADs), or work permits, for TPS holders are automatically extended beyond the printed expiration date to allow time for processing renewal applications. Those extension dates also are included on the timeline.

Employers should not and need not reverify work authorization documents of individuals in TPS status simply based on these announcements regarding the future termination of TPS. Employers are, however, required to reverify work authorization documents upon their expiration. At such time, workers should simply present copies of the Federal Register notices to show the automatic extension of their work permits. Federal guidance on TPS re-registration and EAD renewal, including Federal Register notices, can be found at uscis.gov/tps.

Should an employer refuse to allow a TPS holder to work despite having timely re-registered, the worker should contact the union. Individuals in TPS status also should investigate whether they may be eligible for any other type of immigration relief, and the union can refer them to appropriate counsel.

Materials included in this packet:

• Timeline of upcoming deadlines related to TPS terminations

• Specific alerts for TPS workers from Haiti and El Salvador

• Instruction on how to re-register for TPS

• A sample letter for a TPS worker to take to their employer or human resources representative about their work authorization

• A sample letter urging Congress to enact a path to citizenship for TPS holders

• A fact sheet on the TPS program

For campaign materials and more information about ways to get involved in the fight for a permanent fix for deserving TPS workers, go to go.aflcio.org/immigrationresources.

If you have questions or need additional support, please contact Shannon Lederer at slederer@aflcio.org or 202-637-5308.

DEC. 6 NOON

Join us for a day of action as we demand that Congress take
action on a clean DREAM Act and permanent status for TPS

holders. Our communities cannot wait!
December 6, 2017

@Noon

U.S. Capitol Washington D.C.

For More information please contact:
ELIZABETH ALEX, CASA ealex@WEARECASA.ORG

Let’s work together to make a better life for Latina women working in the US.

UFCW International Secretary-Treasurer Esther López explains more about today and how we can work together to make a better life for Latina women working in the US:
“There exists a sure-fire way for Latina women to earn the better wages they deserve: joining a union in their industry. Latina women who have joined a union earn more than their non-union counterparts. For decades, the labor movement, constituency groups, women’s organizations and other allies have been fighting for just and safe working conditions for hard-working families. Many of these folks are Latina women who are constantly finding new and innovative ways to bring people together and drive them to action.”

Latina Equal Pay Day Is Nov. 2

Although Latinas make substantial contributions to the U.S. economy, they have the largest wage gap, typically earning only 54 cents for every dollar earned by White, non-Hispanic men. You can help us fight unfair and unequal wages by supporting hard-working Latinas on Thursday, Nov. 2.

Latinas must work more than 22 months to earn what White men earn in 12 months. This disparity in pay hurts not only Latinas, but also has a significant impact on the families and communities they support.

Please get involved and help us draw attention to this economic disparity by joining the Twitter storm (#LatinaEqualPay and #Trabajadoras) on Thursday, Nov. 2 at 2-3 p.m. Eastern Time. Additional information about Latina Equal Pay Day is available here.

Holding the Line on Workplace Rights

Immigration

July 27, 2017

The labor movement strives to make every job in our country a good job. To do that, we must and we will stand with every worker in the fight for basic rights and dignity on the job. We will not allow union members or any workers to lose their rights and status. We will fight for and with them just as they have fought for and with all of us.

Continue Reading…

2017 United Latinos Educational Conference

Be Bold, Speak Out, Fight Back! 

Agenda Overview

 

Thursday

Registration 12 noon

Welcome Reception 6 pm

 

Friday

Conference Kick off 8:30 am

Workshops 2pm – 4pm

 

Saturday

Conference Starts 9 am

Workshops 2pm – 4pm

Reception 6pm

Awards Gala 7 pm

This Year’s Honorees include;

Joe Barragan Award: UFCW Canada

John Rene Rodriguez Award: RWDSU

Building Community/Building Union Community Allies Award –

Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights 

Champions for Justice Award:

UFCW Local 1776 and UFCW Local 1149

Sunday

Breakfast 8am

Screening of “The Long Ride”  9 am

Immigration Update 10:45 – 12pm

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS!

In the United States, every person—whether documented or undocumented—has the constitutional right to remain silent and to refuse to answer questions of the police, Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), or the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), whether on the street, in a car, or at home.

Under the law, the ICE must have proof you are not from the United States to deport you. They can use the following information against you:

• If you run and the ICE catches you.

• If you tell the ICE where you were born or that you don’t have papers.

• If you carry false documents.

• If you carry papers from your country. If you are questioned by the ICE, you are NOT required to reveal any information, such as your name, address, or home country. If you are questioned or detained, however, it usually is a good idea to give your name so that friends, family, or your attorney can locate you.

Below are links to resources that will help you understand your rights in the United States.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS CARD

FAMILY PREPAREDNESS PLAN

KNOW HOW TO PROTECT YOUR FAMILY


¡CONOZCA SUS DERECHOS!

En los Estados Unidos, toda persona—documentada o no documentada—tiene el derecho a callar y a rehusarse a contestar preguntas de la policía, la Agencia Federal de Investigaciones (FBI), o de la migra, ya sea en la calle, en un carro, o en su casa.

Bajo la ley, la migra necesita tener pruebas de que usted no es de este país para deportarlo. Ellos pueden usar la siguiente información en su contra:

• Si usted corre y la migra lo agarra.

• Si usted le dice a la migra donde nació y que no tiene papeles.

• Si usted usa documentos falsos.

• Si usted usa documentos de su país. Si es interrogado por la migra, usted NO está obligado a revelar ninguna información, como su nombre, dirección o el país de origen. Sin embargo, si es interrogado es buena idea dar su nombre para que su familia, amigos o abogado puedan localizarlo.

A continuación encontrará enlaces a recursos que le ayudarán a entender sus derechos en los Estados Unidos.

CONOZCA SU TARJETA DE DERECHOS

PLAN DE PREPARACIÓN PARA LA FAMILIA


Women marching against Trump:

Sisters and Brothers

Below is a brief translation of the Article that came out in the New York times (Spanish) after the march and below that is a link showing pictures of marchers that were featured in the Article and you might recognize one of our own Esther Lopez. I thought you might be interested. They all should be commended for participation.

 

Pete Maturino
President United Latinos
 ____________________________________________

Women marching against Trump: “Everything that I believe in is being attacked”

Washington- They started the march early Saturday until the evening hours. Hundreds of thousands of different ages, genders and creeds The women and the men that demonstrated here and other cities the day after the inauguration of Donald Trump for different motives but they were all united against in what to them represented the new president; the intolerance, the misogyny, the lack of appreciation of migrants and Muslims, the arrogance and intimidation.

The march of Women in Washington DC brought together different sectors that repudiated Trump – that responded accusing the media for ignoring his followers – but for many an opportunity to strengthen ties; to pay homage to their mothers, daughters and sisters; to affirm their identity and their values together with others. It was both a political manifestation and a way to ward off collective fear.

The amount of people that gathered was such that it was hard to march from one side to the other. Washington was converted in a city taken by dozens of marches, in an opportunity for the meeting. It was calculated that half a million people were out in the streets on Saturday in the capitol of the United States, a multitude three times as large then  the one that attended the take over of Trump on Friday.

 

The New York Times photographed and talked with different women throughout the day. Read some of their testimonies and their stories by click here on this link.

 

What’s up next for the Americas?

Join us for a dynamic and interactive discussion taking place just two days after the U.S. presidential election.

 

Advocates, experts and activists from across the U.S., Mexico and Central America will join Alianza leaders to debate the question:

What do U.S. elections mean for the Americas?

An exciting line-up of speakers will bring perspectives from Latino communities, youth, black immigrants, Arab and Muslim communities, and advocates for vulnerable migrants in countries of origin and transit.

Speakers include:

  • Rashida Tlaib National Network of Arab American Communities (former Michigan State legislator)
  • Esther Lopez International Secretary-Treasurer, United Food & Commercial Workers International (UFCW)
  • Marybeth Onyeukwu Member, Black Immigration Network Greisa Martinez Advocacy Director, United We Dream (UWD)
  • Maureen Meyer Senior Associate for Mexico and Migrant Rights, Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA)

 

Register Now

 

Click here for more information.